Feilden Fowles win competition for new Homerton College Dining Hall

Feilden Fowles has won a competition run by Malcolm Reading Consultants to design a £7 million dining hall for Homerton College, University of Cambridge. Feilden Fowles’ design features masonry piers and a faience and glass corona, while the scheme also includes new kitchens and support spaces.

The London-based practice saw off a shortlist that included dRMM, which came second in the competition; last year’s Stirling Prize winner Caruso St John; Hall McKnight; and Walters & Cohen. Some 155 practices registered their interest in the competition at the first stage, with 24 selected for the long list. 

“We are thrilled to win this open competition to design new dining facilities for Homerton College. We feel very honoured to be given the opportunity ahead of more established practices and feel it reflects the genuine openness of the competition process, as well as the college’s belief in investing in young talent. The project offers a unique chance to create a transformational space at the heart of an already stunning site. This is a privilege we do not take lightly and we are determined to deliver a world class facility. We can’t wait to get started.”

Read the Malcolm Reading press release here. More details on the project here.

Feilden Fowles feature at ‘School/Work’ exhibition at The Cass

‘School/Work: Architectural Conversations between Pedagogy and Practice’ is a new exhibition focusing on the relationship between the theoretical world of university and the applied world of practice and making in architecture, opening on 17 March at the Cass Bank Gallery at Central House.

The exhibition features the work of five award-winning architects who teach at the school: Assemble, Caruso St John, Cottrell & Vermeulen Architecture, Feilden Fowles Architects and Takero Shimazaki Architects. School/Work presents architectural models, drawings, photography and archival material exploring how studio culture meets academia.

More details here.

Ed Fowles on panel of RIBA President’s Debate: ROBOTS ARE TOMORROW’S ARCHITECTS

The most recent RIBA President’s Debate proposed the motion Robots Are Tomorrow’s Architects. Invited speakers argued both sides of a 21st century debate about the future of architecture, posing questions regarding advances in technology which have long been recognised as a threat to manual labour. But now skilled jobs, including those in architecture, are at risk. Can we adapt to this new digital age or will we face the rise of the robots?

Chaired by Professor Flora Samuel, Chair of the RIBA Research and Innovation Group.

For the motion was Dale Sinclair, RIBA’s Ambassador for Collaboration and Technical, a Director of AECOM and CIC Board member; and Alastair Parvin, ‎Co-founder at WikiHouse Foundation.

Against the motion was Edmund Fowles, Feilden Fowles and Gillian Lambert, AOC Architecture, who advocated the value traditional methods of design and the in-depth thought processes that architects contribute to every project.

New Visitor Centre for Carlisle Cathedral gains full planning

Carlisle Cathedral Fratry project has gained planning permission and CFCE permissions. This is a great triumph for the client and design team achieving consents for a project first conceived ten years ago. This is the first new building in the precinct for over 300 years and it replaces the west range of the cloister destroyed during the reformation.

Feilden Fowles shortlisted for Homerton College, Cambridge

The practice has made the final shortlist of 5 for the new Homerton College Dining Hall, Cambridge. This shortlist has been reduced from an initial 150 submissions from around Europe and marks the growing recognition of the practices approach and design credentials. The interview will be in January with the successful team being announced in February.

A pair of new town houses in Notting Hill granted planning permission.

Our largest London project to date, two new town houses in Notting Hill has gained planning permission. The pair of homes replace a semi-derelict, post war terrace and will meet the highest environmental standards. The design draws reference from the unique early Victorian setting at the heart of the Ladbroke Conservation area.